Looking Back on “Dad Called it Decoration Day.”

During various news reports this weekend, I heard several newscasters discussing the history of what is now called Memorial Day but was initially referred to as Decoration Day. Well, that was not news to me, since I discussed this same piece of history three years ago.

Unfortunately, this year we are not seeing the typical services throughout the nation of people laying wreaths on the graves of their loved ones or parades in small towns like my hometown–good old Boonton USA–where I marched down Main Street while decked out in my Brownie uniform.

Because of what is happening in America this year, we can watch someone who did not serve in any war as he visits Arlington Cemetary and Fort McHenry, or we can turn on the news and watch way too many people crowd beaches and pools despite warnings to social distance because of the coronavirus.  I am doing neither, because today is a day to remain calm. So I remember my Dad and my grandfather who served, but did not die,  in the two word wars, and I can remember  that Dad Called it Decoration Day.

About kjw616

I am a genealogy detective. I have already written one book about my Irish family's journey from 19th century Ireland to the United States- a family history sprinkled with personal anecdotes. My second book was intended to be a similar story about my Russian ancestors. Instead, it turned into a tale of just my father's immediate family. It is the tale of what happens when 6 children from New Jersey are moved to the Soviet Union by their Russian-born parents during the Great Depression. It details who lives, who dies, and who is able to return to NJ during a time when leaving the USSR was not an easy endeavor, particularly during World War II and the Cold War. It is my hope that those interested in history during this time period will find this story fascinating as well as those fellow amateur family historians who will learn some of the tools such as ancestry.com, visits to the National Archives, and local libraries I used to uncover this story.
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